Community-supported local food systems and agriculture in planning schemes

For more information on why local government should implement this code, and supporting strategies that can be introduced, see Community-supported local food systems and agriculture in the Corporate Plan Tools section of this resource package.

Community-supported local food systems and agriculture are currently not identified as a land use in the Queensland Planning Provisions. While there are opportunities for Councils to progress this with the State Government, the information in this section may be inserted into an existing land use code, or inserted as a planning scheme policy.

A planning scheme can encourage innovation by ensuring food gardens, community gardens etc. are incorporated into design and development. Changes to planning schemes can be made up front, in a similar way that sustainability and climate responsive principles have been included in schemes.

The draft codes provided in this section have been designed to be inserted into existing codes.

Each planning scheme is different and in addition to the codes below, it is recommended that a review of other codes is performed to ensure the planning scheme as a whole supports edible landscapes and community gardens etc. For example, if an individual grew food and sold it to someone, would the home business or commercial code be triggered? Would this be the outcome local government was expecting? Ideally the planning scheme will not have barriers to small scale produce sales or trade.

In addition, a review of the agriculture/farm codes can occur to ensure that it is triggered only for the more ‘traditional farms’ (such as livestock) and not triggered if someone is wanting to set up a community garden on a private property, such as on a roof or in a common area of a multi-unit dwelling.

Finally, a review of the planning scheme can also consider the extent to which the principles of the codes reflect State Planning Policy 1/92: Development and Conservation of Agricultural Land and the Guideline 2 for SPP 1/92 Separating Agricultural and Residential Land Uses. These policies are intended to reduce the potential for conflict between farming activities and other development in planning schemes. Although this will be achieved to a great extent, there is the opportunity to provide supporting policy through:

  • Strategic Outcomes
  • Codes supporting good quality agricultural land
  • Examining master plans to ensure healthy food retail options (such as supermarkets and farmers’ markets) are expressly allowed in a variety of neighbourhoods
  • Reviewing the definition of a house to include small-scale community gardens or edible landscapes as ancillary uses where produce is grown on site
  • Reviewing the definition of agriculture to include roadside stalls as ancillary. The definition may state that the use is ancillary where it is for the sale of produce grown on the same farm and limit the size of the stall, such as to no more than 20m2.

The following code inserts are provided in this section to assist implementation of community gardens in new developments:

  • Residential unit developments code insert
  • Retirement villages code insert

Residential unit developments code insert

This code insert is optional for this land use. The code may be used in full or in part, and the suggested measurements may also be amended to suit local requirements. The aim of the code is to ensure space is provided to have a community garden. For medium- to high-density residential units, an option may be to provide this space on the roof of the development, if it is safe and accessible to all residents.

This code can also be used for other uses that have a requirement for open space, such as child care centres.

  1. The purpose of this code is to promote the provision and use of communal garden areas and edible landscapes in residential unit developments.
  2. The purpose of the code will be achieved through the following overall outcomes:
  3. The provision of open space that can be used as a communal garden

Code

Performance outcomes Acceptable outcomes
P01 Residents have access to a common open space area, which has the potential to be developed as communal food garden or edible landscape. AO1.1 A minimum of 35% of the site is landscaped with:

  1. areas of deep planting; and
  2. at least one communal recreational feature (such as a swimming pool or tennis court); and
  3. an area with raised garden beds, at least 700mm off the ground with a solid edge of at least 150mm suitable for food planting, with a minimum of 0.25m2 per unit, with a maximum depth of:
      1. 2m where the beds can be accessed from three or four sides; or

    1m where beds can be accessed from one or two sides;

AND

AO1.2 Water connections within 10m of garden bed/s;

OR

AO1.3 Sufficient capacity is retained within the building design to enable communal garden areas to be redeveloped as a community garden, when desired.

PO2 Access to at least one common open space area is suitable for wheelchairs and other mobility aids AO2.1 No acceptable measures specified

Retirement villages code insert

This code insert is optional for this land use. The code may be used in full or in part, and the suggested measurements may also be amended to suit local requirements. The aim of the code is to ensure space is provided to have a community garden. It is noted for medium- to high-density villages an option may be to provide this space on the roof of the development, if it is safe and accessible to all residents.

Purpose

Ensure

  1. The purpose of this code is to promote the design of retirement villages to create supportive environments for physical activity and healthy eating.
  2. The purpose of the code will be achieved through the following overall outcomes:
  3. The provision of open space that can be used as a communal garden

Code

 

Performance outcomes Acceptable outcomes
PO1 The retirement village provides residents with a range of on-site services and facilities. AO1.1 The retirement village incorporates a range of ancillary services and facilities, suited to the function of the facility and the needs of residents, such as lounge areas, library/reading room, TV games/recreation room, pharmacy, meeting space/s, hairdresser and convenience store, communal food gardens.
PO2 Residents of retirement villages have access to garden space for planting and water taps in close proximity to the garden. AO2.1 The area of the garden beds are a minimum of 0.5m2per unit, with a maximum depth of:

  1. 2m where the beds can be accessed from at least three sides; or
  2. 1m where beds can be accessed from one or two sides;

AND

AO2.2 The garden bed/s are raised a minimum of 700mm from the ground with a solid edge of at least 150mm;

AND

AO2.3 The garden bed/s are located within 300m of any unit;

AND

AO2.4 Water connections within 10m of garden bed/s;

OR

AO2.5 Sufficient capacity is retained within the building design to enable communal garden areas to be redeveloped as a community garden in the future.

PO3 Site planning of the retirement village aids orientation, way-finding and movement. AO3.1 The site plan and circulation pattern is easy to identify, remember and explain to visitors with clear unit addresses within the conventional system of streets, entries;ANDAO3.2 Unit design provides a clear and consistent distinction between the front and back doors of the units;ANDAO3.3 Natural and built landmarks and other ‘cues’ — such as colour and decorative planting — give identity to different parts of a large site;ANDAO3.4 A clear, interpretive, illuminated sign and site map is provided at the main site entry, at a scale suitable to the surrounding neighbourhood.
PO4 Access to at least one common open space area is suitable for wheelchairs and other mobility aids. AO4.1 No acceptable measures specified
PO5 Retirement/ aged-care villages are designed with development addressing the public streets and not provided in a gated street format. AO5.1 No acceptable measures specified